Egypt Independent

The rules of the game



Asked about whether what happened on 25 January 2011 was a revolution or not, Dr Botros Ghali, one of the most influential Egyptian politicians in Egyptian history, answered with a striking reply, “I don't care what the definition is, I will leave this to the academics. What I care about is the outcome.” The definition didn't matter much to him; what mattered was the result.
 
And that is what also really matters to the people. The average person in many societies wouldn't care much about ideologies, rhetoric or eloquence. The effect of rhetoric has always been a short-lived experience. It is only politicians that can read reality well, address the problems people are suffering and handle them accordingly. Politicians are the ones who can create new realities that create new phases in the history of a nation. People are seeking security, stability and a better standard of living. Their demands are simple yet uncompromising. The more realistic a politician is, the more likely he or she continues to contribute to the world of politics. 
 
In a series of interviews conducted in France about the alleged affair Hollande is having with the French actress Gayet, many of the interviewees didn't care much about his private life or whether he was cheating on his mistress or not. What they cared about was his performance as a president. “One of the interviewees in a BBC program said, 'I voted for Hollande for what he does in office not what he does in bed.'” This illustrates to a great extent how much  people in the Western world prioritize outcome over everything else.
 
Saudia Arabia is the third largest country in US dollar reserves and that can explain how effectively they could interfere in the international scene. On August 18, 2013, the Saudi Foreign Minister stressed the importance of maintaining security and stability in Egypt, while implementing the road map to elections laid out by the current government. He insisted that any demonstrations must be nonviolent and expressed his disappointment in many countries ignoring the actions of terrorists in Egypt. He was surprised that some countries ignored the fact that some demonstrators carry machine guns and other weapons. He was very decisive in his stand that gave Egypt great support at a critical time in its relations with Turkey. Turkey had been scheming against the Egyptian government and trying so hard to fan the fire, yet the Saudi stand dramatically changed the rules of the game. 
 
It is never about what's right or wrong, fair or unfair. It has always been about the ability to size your power in relation to others. Al Sadat, one of the shrewdest politicians in the Middle East, knew how to handle the Israeli conflict well. As a leader, he knew when to talk, when to wage a war and when to negotiate. 
 
It is never about voicing great ideas. It has always been about the ability to create a new reality and to make a real change, a change that people can feel and appreciate.